Sedgwick
© Copyright 2003-2017 Stephen Sedgwick
12 string Mandolin & Mandriola
Most people refer to this instrument as a 12-string mandolin but strung with triple courses (3-3-3-3) and still tuned G, D, A,  E. The extra strings gives the instrument a fuller sound and makes it slightly easier for tremolo picking. There are a couple  of variations on how the instrument can be strung as described below, but once you play a 12-string mandolin it is hard to  go back to a regular one.  The most famous and traditional mandolin is the Italian Neapolitan mandolin, with the deep round lute like back. According  to Franz Jahnel's 'Manual of Guitar Technology' The Sicilian mandolin was similar to the Neapolitan type but has a wider  neck because it had 11-strings. The top three courses had triple strings with the lowest string on each course tuned an  octave lower. The lowest course being 'G' was usually just doubled, but the modern instruments have complete triple  stringing. (With the body so small, acoustically it wouldn't work so well to have an octave lower G-string. This is probably  why the G only had double strings).  The Mandriola is another name for the instrument but strung slightly different. One of the strings in each of the lower  courses are tuned an octave down. The alternative way to string the instrument is to have one of the strings in each of the  lower courses tuned an octave up. The string company Optima did produce two sets of mandriola strings, High Octave  and Low Octave.  The more common approach is to have triple courses of the same gauge rather than adding any octave strings, which is  pictured to the right.
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Sedgwick
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© Copyright 2003-2017 Stephen Sedgwick
12 string Mandolin & Mandriola
Most people refer to this instrument as a 12-string  mandolin but strung with triple courses (3-3-3-3) and still tuned G, D, A, E. The extra strings gives the  instrument a fuller sound and makes it slightly easier  for tremolo picking. There are a couple of variations  on how the instrument can be strung as described  below, but once you play a 12-string mandolin it is  hard to go back to a regular one. The most famous and traditional mandolin is the  Italian Neapolitan mandolin, with the deep round lute  like back. According to Franz Jahnel's 'Manual of  Guitar Technology' The Sicilian mandolin was similar  to the Neapolitan type but has a wider neck because  it had 11-strings. The top three courses had triple  strings with the lowest string on each course tuned  an octave lower. The lowest course being 'G' was  usually just doubled, but the modern instruments  have complete triple stringing. (With the body so  small, acoustically it wouldn't work so well to have  an octave lower G-string. This is probably why the G  only had double strings). The Mandriola is another name for the instrument but strung slightly  different. One of the strings in each of the lower courses are tuned an  octave down. The alternative way to string the instrument is to have one of the strings in each of the lower courses tuned an octave up. The string  company Optima did produce two sets of mandriola strings, High Octave  and Low Octave. The more common approach is to have triple courses of the same gauge  rather than adding any octave strings, which is pictured to the right.
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