Sedgwick
© Copyright 2003-2017 Stephen Sedgwick
Sedgwick Sitar Guitar with Sympathetic Strings
Sedgwick Sitar Guitar & Sympathetic Strings
I have always loved the 'Eastern' mysticism and esoteric sounds.  The most popular and recognizable Eastern sound comes from  the Indian instrument the Sitar, which has a soft droning buzz  effect. The instrument I have made is no way a replacement of  the sitar, but a guitar that sounds like a sitar. What makes the  Sedgwick instrument more amazing is that it can be set up in  different ways. From a full buzzing sitar guitar to a regular guitar  or something in between. This makes the whole instrument  much more versatile.  This instrument is a Sedgwick model with a few extras that  include Paua Abalone rosette, Koa Bindings and a cutaway. The  metal bridge pins are by Goulding Guitars and this guitar also  has a custom stereo K&K pickup.
There are 3 ways the guitar section ca n be set up. You can have the Indian style s addle covering all 6 strings  You can have the Indian style s addle for the 1st and 2nd string. A regular bone saddle goes under the lower 4 strings. This g ives a wonderful blend of East meets West. Have a regular guitar saddle.  A couple of advantages with this k ind of instrument has is that you can use many more open tunings than a sitar and you can  also use a capo. There is also the possibility of exploring some Indian   slide guitar music.
Guitar  / Jawari Saddle
Home News Guitars Harp Guitars Unique & Bespoke Music About Ordering Contact The Sympathetic Strings are a separate section. These strings are not plucked and just resonate, so you hardly have to change them. They can be tuned chromatically, to a scale/mode or to a chord. They add a subtle drone and reverb to the sound. With the pickup installed you can boost the signal of sympathetic strings. There are 2 types of bridges for the sympathetic strings, a little guitar bridge or an Indian jawari bridge to give them a buzz. These little bridges are interchangeable, just slide it out towards the soundhole. You can also mute the strings if necessary. Part of the inspiration comes from the Sympitars made by Fred Carlson and the English Violet. The English Violet had twice as many sympathetic strings as the viola díamore.  History repeats... In a blog by Gregg Miner, he writes about an 'Guitar D'Amore'. A historic guitar with sympathetic strings going through the neck, very much the same way I made my instrument. This special guitar was built either 1850 or 1856 by violin maker Tomasz Zach in Prague. Zach also made quite a few viola dímores. Australian historic instrument maker and repairer Ian Watchorn has restored the guitar DíAmore. He also did a wonderful detailed description of it's restoration. Sympathetic Strings
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Sedgwick
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© Copyright 2003-2017 Stephen Sedgwick
Sitar Guitar & Sympathetic Strings
I have always loved the 'Eastern' mysticism and esoteric sounds. The  most popular and recognizable Eastern sound comes from the Indian  instrument the Sitar, which has a soft droning buzz effect. The instrument  I have made is no way a replacement of the sitar, but a guitar that sounds  like a sitar. What makes the Sedgwick instrument more amazing is that it  can be set up in different ways. From a full buzzing sitar guitar to a  regular guitar or something in between. This makes the whole instrument  much more versatile. 
There are 3 ways the guitar section can be set up. You can have the Indian style saddle covering all 6 strings You can have the Indian style saddle for the 1st and 2nd string. A  regular bone saddle goes under the lower 4 strings. This gives a  wonderful blend of East meets West.  Have a regular guitar saddle. A couple of advantages with this kind of instrument has is that you can  use many more open tunings than a sitar and you can also use a capo.  There is also the possibility of exploring some Indian slide guitar music.  
Guitar  / Jawari Saddle
Menu The Sympathetic Strings are a separate section. These strings are not plucked and just resonate, so you hardly have to change them. They can be tuned chromatically, to a scale/mode or to a chord. They add a subtle drone and reverb to the sound. With the pickup installed you can boost the signal of sympathetic strings. There are 2 types of bridges for the sympathetic strings, a little guitar bridge or an Indian jawari bridge to give them a buzz. These little bridges are interchangeable, just slide it out towards the soundhole. You can also mute the strings if necessary. Part of the inspiration comes from the Sympitars made by Fred Carlson and the English Violet. The English Violet had twice as many sympathetic strings as the viola díamore.  History repeats... In a blog by Gregg Miner, he writes about an 'Guitar D'Amore'. A historic guitar with sympathetic strings going through the neck, very much the same way I made my instrument. This special guitar was built either 1850 or 1856 by violin maker Tomasz Zach in Prague. Zach also made quite a few viola dímores. Australian historic instrument maker and repairer Ian Watchorn has restored the guitar DíAmore. He also did a wonderful detailed description of it's restoration. Sympathetic Strings