Sedgwick
© Copyright 2003-2017 Stephen Sedgwick
10 String Harp Guitar  These kinds of 10-string instruments were common in central Europe in the mid 19th Century and were played by many top musicians of that period such as  Johann Kaspar Mertz (1806-1856) and Ferdinando Carulli (1770-1841). When they published their music at the time, it was only ever arranged for 6-string  guitar. The ten string guitar was made more popular with thanks to Russian noble man Nicholas Makaroff (Makarov) (1810-1890), who organized a  competition for 10-string guitars to be made and music written for them. The competition took place in Brussels in 1856. At the time they had nylon strings  with four of the ten strings as floating bass strings tuned ABCD. There was also usually a support arm for the extra strings. The instrument developed extra  bass strings in the late 19th Century and became known as contra bass guitars or Kontragitarre 
This instrument I started to make 150 years after Makaroff's event and is a more modern approach with steel strings. The bridge is in the middle of the lower  bout for better bass response and thus the neck is off set, which allows the bass to resonate more. I used carbon fibre rods in the neck for strength and to  prevent the neck from warping or twisting. This instrument should not be confused with the 20th century 10-string Spanish guitar, which was developed by  José Ramirez III (1922-1995) and Narciso Yepes (1927-1997). The four extra strings were originally just sympathetic as Ramierz III says in his book "Things  About The Guitar". Modern players sometimes pluck and fret these extra strings like a normal guitar. Another web site about multi string guitars is Cathedral  Guitars.
Soundboard: European spruce  Back & Sides: Indian Rosewood  Neck: Mahogany  Fingerboard: Ebony  Bridge: Indian Rosewood  Rosette: Mother of Pearl  Bindings: Madagascar rosewood  Tuners: Gotoh and Schaller  Finish: French polish  Body Join:12th fret (22 frets)  Nut width: 46mm (1.81")  Scale Length: 648mm (25.5")  Lower bout: 381mm (15")  Body depth: 115mm (4.5")  Body length: 495mm (19.5")  Cutaway: Compound Florentine 
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Sedgwick
Guitars
© Copyright 2003-2017 Stephen Sedgwick
10 String Harp Guitar  These kinds of 10-string instruments were common in central Europe in  the mid 19th Century and were played by many top musicians of that  period such as Johann Kaspar Mertz (1806-1856) and Ferdinando Carulli (1770-1841). When they published their music at the time, it was only  ever arranged for 6-string guitar. The ten string guitar was made more  popular with thanks to Russian noble man Nicholas Makaroff (Makarov)  (1810-1890), who organized a competition for 10-string guitars to be  made and music written for them. The competition took place in Brussels  in 1856. At the time they had nylon strings with four of the ten strings as  floating bass strings tuned ABCD. There was also usually a support arm  for the extra strings. The instrument developed extra bass strings in the  late 19th Century and became known as contra bass guitars or  Kontragitarre
This instrument I started to make 150 years after Makaroff's event and is  a more modern approach with steel strings. The bridge is in the middle of  the lower bout for better bass response and thus the neck is off set,  which allows the bass to resonate more. I used carbon fibre rods in the  neck for strength and to prevent the neck from warping or twisting. This  instrument should not be confused with the 20th century 10-string  Spanish guitar, which was developed by José Ramirez III (1922-1995)  and Narciso Yepes (1927-1997). The four extra strings were originally just sympathetic as Ramierz III says in his book "Things About The Guitar".  Modern players sometimes pluck and fret these extra strings like a  normal guitar. Another web site about multi string guitars is Cathedral  Guitars.
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